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“I live with more hope. I experience less violence and more respect”, said Chann*, a woman survivor of violence living with a disability in Cambodia. She received targeted services from the Cambodia Women’s Crisis Centre (CWCC), a grantee of the UN Trust Fund. Together with ADD International, also a grantee of the UN Trust Fund, these organizations are working towards a future free from violence for women and girls with disabilities.
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Since 2011, the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women (UN Trust Fund) has funded two generations of projects supporting the Victims Support Section of the ECCC, which has worked to ensure that women survivors of violence under the Khmer Rouge become visible and participate in the justice process.
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Raising Voices, a Uganda-based non-governmental organization dedicated to preventing and ending violence against women and girls, implemented an adaptation research study of its successful methodology called SASA!. The SASA! approach aims to change social norms by addressing the imbalance of power between women and men – a key driver of violence against women.
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From 1975 to 1979 the Khmer Rouge committed specific forms of sexual and gender-based violence, including systematic forced marriage and rape, while carrying out mass killings in Cambodia. Since 2011, the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women (UN Trust Fund) has funded two generations of projects to support the work of the Victims Support Section of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC). The projects ensured that women survivors of violence under the Khmer Rouge regime become visible and have access to justice and reparations, as the evidence generated through projects implementation and by an external evaluation inform.
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World Hope International (WHI), a grantee of the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women (UN Trust Fund), is working to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of service provision to survivors of violence in Cambodia, with the aim of ending and preventing violence. “Government social workers assigned to communes [small groups of villages] have a broad mandate”, says WHI Cambodia Director Talmage Payne, “[as] they work with youth, veterans, women and children”. This affects service providers’ ability and preparedness to respond to the specific needs of each of these constituencies.
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Women working in the informal sector – often the only opportunity for employment for many women in Tanzania – are disproportionately affected by violence. The informal and often unregulated nature of such working environments is additionally aggravated by the absence of mechanisms to report violence and protect women from harassment. In order to meet the needs of women who are often exposed to both violence and economic instability, Equality for Growth is implementing Give Payment, Not Abuse: Protecting Informal Women Traders in Dar es Salaam from Violence against Women, a project based in six markets in Dar es Salaam and funded by the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women (UN Trust Fund).