108
results found
Date:
From January 2013 to December 2015, DEMUS led a project to further the rights of women who have experienced gender-based violence in six Peruvian judicial districts, specifically by improving the women’s access to justice. The final evaluation found that the institutional changes achieved were significant, but stressed the importance of implementing monitoring and evaluation measures to sustain the changes.
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Between December 2013 and November 2015, the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women funded the Indonesian Positive Women’s Network’s initiative “One Stop Service: Integrated Services for Violence against Women Survivors and Women Living with HIV”. The goal was to increase women’s awareness of their rights and improve the health of women and girls in Jakarta and North Sumatra who are living with HIV/AIDS and experience gender-based violence. The final evaluation found the project was successful and particularly relevant.
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The European Center for Minority Issues in Kosovo implemented the project "Empowering Minority Communities in Kosovo against Gender-Based Violence" between January 2014 and December 2015, with support from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project’s goals and outputs were achieved through consultation with project partners, cooperation with local stakeholders and input from paralegals.
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From December 2013 to November 2016, the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women funded the project “WAYE – Women and Youth Empowered by Access to Information to Protect their Rights and Improving Service Delivery to Protect their Health”, which was implemented by Medical Services Pacific. The final evaluation found that the project efficiently achieved its objectives.
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The project Transitional Justice: Addressing Gender-Based Violence and Ensuring Women’s Participation was implemented by the International Center for Transitional Justice from November 2012 to October 2015, and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that this complex project in six countries achieved some results despite of a range of implementation challenges.
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The Belize government’s Women’s Department led the project “Implementation of National Gender-based Violence Plan of Action” with support from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation showed that training sessions considerably improved the ability of service providers to deliver sensitive services to women, and that permanent advocacy and education programmes are key to tackling gender-based violence.
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The project Enhancing a Community-Based, Multi-Sectoral Response to Gender-Based Violence in Ban Mae Nai Soi and Ban Mae Surin, Karenni Refugee Camps, was implemented by the International Rescue Committee from November 2012 to October 2015 and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project had made a significant impact overall, including on the psychosocial wellbeing of survivors of violence who accessed services provided.
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The project Integrated Response to Gender-Based Violence against Women in Serbia was implemented by the UN Country Team in Serbia from November 2012 to October 2015 and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project had contributed significantly to the building of an integrated response of the UN Country Team, the Serbian Government and development partners to violence against women by improving capacities of key stakeholders to implement measures to address the violence.
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Samvedana is an intervention programme aimed at reducing violence against women in sex work in Karnataka, India. It was implemented from December 2011 to July 2015 by the Karnataka Health Promotion Trust and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that female sex workers and community-based organizations gained knowledge about violence against women and its relation to health and wellbeing, and felt empowered to address the issue collectively
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The project Uruguay Unites to End Violence Against Women, Girls and Adolescents was implemented by the UN Country Team from January 2012 to December 2014 and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project made important progress and that the participation of multiple stakeholders from civil society, the Uruguay Government and the UN system was new and bold.
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Let’s Promote Justice for Our Women and Girls of Sierra Leone was a three-year project, implemented by the International Rescue Committee from December 2011 to November 2014, with grant support from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that, thanks to the project, women believe in the possibility of a violence-free community and lead conversations about such issues with other women and community leaders.
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The project Anti-Harassment Committee and Violence Prevention System in Export-Oriented Garment Factories was implemented in south India and Bangladesh by the Fair Wear Foundation from October 2011 to March 2015, with support from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found the project was effective in responding to the needs of women and girls in the garment industry, and that some innovative ideas had been developed that could be useful in other sectors.
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The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women funded Physicians for Human Rights’ three-year initiative “Formation of a Medico-Legal Network to Address Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict in Central and Eastern Africa” from September 2011 to August 2014. The project aimed to provide professionals with the resources, knowledge and skills needed to support survivors of sexual violence. The final evaluation concluded that a survivor-centred approach enabled the programme to achieve positive change in the targeted areas.
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Engaging Men to Strengthen the Implementation of Gender-Based Violence Laws and Policies and Promote Gender Equality in Kenya, Rwanda and Sierra Leone was implemented by Sonke Gender Justice from August 2011 to August 2014, and supported by a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project had empowered women and men to report gender-based violence and to work against practices that perpetuate it.
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Documenting and Addressing Violence and Other Rights Abuses as Experienced by Positive Women” was implemented by the AIDS Legal Network in three provinces of South Africa from September 2011 to August 2014, and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found the project was highly effective in developing a credible evidence base on violence against women and the intersections of violence and HIV; and engaged women and other stakeholders in capacity building, rights and legal literacy, and addressing access to services.
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The project Strengthening Implementation of a Functional Medico-Legal Framework to Scale-Up Gender-Based Violence Services was implemented from September 2011 to August 2014 by the Kenya NGO Liverpool Care and Treatment (LVCT Health) and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project had a positive impact on the response to sexual and gender-based violence in Kenya.
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Promoting Gender Equality and Improving Access to Justice for Female Survivors and Victims of Gender‐Based Violence under the Khmer Rouge Regime was implemented by the Victims Support Section of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia from October 2011 to November 2014, and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project significantly contributed to ensuring women’s access to their transitional justice rights and raised awareness about gender-based violence.
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The project Traditional Leaders Championing Prevention of Domestic Violence in their Communities in Lesotho and Malawi was implemented by the Southern Africa HIV and AIDS Information Dissemination Service (SAfAIDS) from September 2011 to August 2014 and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that in general, the project brought about positive behaviour change within communities in the fight to eliminate harmful cultural practices.
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The project An Holistic Model to Prevent Gender-Based Violence in Indigenous Populations with an Intercultural Approach was implemented by the UN Country Team in Mexico from May 2010 to May 2013 and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found the project to be relevant within its context and responded to the need for an effective public policy response to a complex problem.
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The project Innovating Citizen Participation in Political Advocacy from Adolescence: Exercising Our Right to a Life Free of Violence in Piura, Junín and the Amazon was implemented by the Association of Social Communicators CALANDRIA from September 2010 to December 2013 and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project contributed to the increased capacity of adolescent and rural women to exercise their rights.