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The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women funded Muloma Women's Development Association’s three-year initiative “Engaging Men Through Accountable Practice (EMAP), To Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls” from March 2017 to March 2020. The project aimed to provide professionals with the resources, knowledge and skills needed to support survivors of sexual violence. The final evaluation concluded that a survivor-centred approach enabled the programme to achieve positive change in the target communities.
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Society Without Violence received funding from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women for its initiative “Integration of gender and gender-based violence subject into educational curriculum in the frames of National 211-215 Strategic Plan” in Armenia from January 2014 to December 2016. The project aimed to empower girls to understand violence and prevent intimate partner and non-partner gender-based violence. The final evaluation found that the project increased awareness on issues related to gender and gender-based violence.
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The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women funded Grassroot Soccer’s initiative “SKILLZ Street Plus”. The project aimed to improve the ability of girls aged 13 to 16 to choose intimate partners who respect gender equality and to prevent and address violence in their lives. The final evaluation concluded that the programme was well implemented, with coaches efficiently delivering school-based sessions.
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ALAFIA received funding from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women to implement the project “Eradication of harmful customary widowhood practices that can lead to HIV/AIDS infection” in 24 villages in Togo. The final evaluation showed that the project ended degrading and humiliating widowhood rites against women in these villages and established the principle of equal sharing of inheritance between women and men.
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Women’s Initiative for Gender Justice received a grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women for its project “Advancing Gender Justice in Countries under ICC investigation” from January 2013 to December 2015. The evaluation found that the project improved medical and psychological documentation of sexual assault, strengthened police investigations and increased the likelihood of justice and reparations for women and girl survivors of sexual violence.
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Let’s Promote Justice for Our Women and Girls of Sierra Leone was a three-year project, implemented by the International Rescue Committee from December 2011 to November 2014, with grant support from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that, thanks to the project, women believe in the possibility of a violence-free community and lead conversations about such issues with other women and community leaders.
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The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women funded Physicians for Human Rights’ three-year initiative “Formation of a Medico-Legal Network to Address Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict in Central and Eastern Africa” from September 2011 to August 2014. The project aimed to provide professionals with the resources, knowledge and skills needed to support survivors of sexual violence. The final evaluation concluded that a survivor-centred approach enabled the programme to achieve positive change in the targeted areas.
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The project Traditional Leaders Championing Prevention of Domestic Violence in their Communities in Lesotho and Malawi was implemented by the Southern Africa HIV and AIDS Information Dissemination Service (SAfAIDS) from September 2011 to August 2014 and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that in general, the project brought about positive behaviour change within communities in the fight to eliminate harmful cultural practices.
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The project Our Girls, Our Future: Building Synergy to End Violence Against Girls, implemented by the Tisunge Ana Athu Akazi Coalition and facilitated by Equality Now in Lusaka, Zambia from January 2010 to December 2012, was awarded a three-year grant by the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation concluded that the model was valuable to share because it targeted perpetrators, victims, the community and organizations that could support the survivors of violence.