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In Cambodia, ADD International implemented the three-year project “Preventing Violence Against Women and Girls with Disabilities in Cambodia: A Community Mobilisation Model” with the support of the UN Trust Fund. The project aimed to prevent and end violence against women and girls with disabilities. The final evaluation found that the project was successfully implemented and was a model for applying a community-based approach to programming.
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Peruvian Women's Centre Flora Tristán implemented the project “Indigenous women ‘My city, my space’: local answers to violence and discrimination” with support from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women for three years. The project aimed to reduce the risk of violence and racial/ethnic discrimination in public spaces for indigenous Amazonian women and girls in Satipo province. The final evaluation found that the project surpassed its goals.
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Cambodia Women’s Crisis Center, in partnership with ADD International, implemented the project “Promoting Women’s Dignity” with support from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The project aimed to improve quality service delivery, develop policy and promote positive changes in attitudes in five provinces.
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As a part of a six-year project, the Victims Support Section of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, in collaboration with the Transcultural Psychosocial Organization Cambodia and the Cambodian Defenders Project, implemented Phase 2 of the Non-Judicial Gender Project. The final evaluation concluded that the project significantly contributed to positive change in the lives of target groups through transitional justice activities and initiatives to improve their access to psychological services and rehabilitation.
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From January 2016 to January 2019, the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women worked with the National Network for the Promotion of Women (RNPM), helping fund its project “Older Women who have Experienced Violence Exercising their Rights”. The final evaluation found that the project was largely successful, and through its training and empowerment strategies it reached 415 women who had experienced gender-based violence.
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The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women provided funds for the project “Enhancing Responses to Violence Against Women and Girls in Cambodia” from January 2016 to December 2018. The goal was to make women feel safer and for survivors of violence to have better access to social and legal services. The final evaluation noted the improved attitude of service providers towards survivors.
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Care International in Cambodia launched the initiative “Safe Workplaces, Safe Communities” in December 2013, supported with funds from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project contributed to a better awareness of gender-based violence within the targeted workplaces.
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From January 2014 to January 2017, the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women funded SOS-Esclaves’ initiative “Justice for Women Leaving Slavery” in Mauritania. The project was built on interconnected activities and international advocacy. The final evaluation found it had been particularly successful in providing legal and educational support for women and children through training, access to legal services and work with government institutions.
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From January 2013 to December 2015, DEMUS led a project to further the rights of women who have experienced gender-based violence in six Peruvian judicial districts, specifically by improving the women’s access to justice. The final evaluation found that the institutional changes achieved were significant, but stressed the importance of implementing monitoring and evaluation measures to sustain the changes.
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Promoting Gender Equality and Improving Access to Justice for Female Survivors and Victims of Gender‐Based Violence under the Khmer Rouge Regime was implemented by the Victims Support Section of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia from October 2011 to November 2014, and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project significantly contributed to ensuring women’s access to their transitional justice rights and raised awareness about gender-based violence.
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The project Innovating Citizen Participation in Political Advocacy from Adolescence: Exercising Our Right to a Life Free of Violence in Piura, Junín and the Amazon was implemented by the Association of Social Communicators CALANDRIA from September 2010 to December 2013 and received a three-year grant from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation found that the project contributed to the increased capacity of adolescent and rural women to exercise their rights.
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The Community-Based Sexual Assault and Prevention Programme, implemented by Social Services of Cambodia (SSC), was funded from January 2009 until December 2011 by the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. The final evaluation concluded that the SSC’s community-based approach to sexual assault provides an effective model of service delivery that reflects the needs and preferences of clients and should set the standard of care for the sector.